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Join a lively, research focussed network, which values and encourages interdisciplinary work across the spectrum of interactions between humans and the environment. 

SEGH has established a series of international conferences and meetings and promotes task force activities to address research and knowledge gaps in the area.  SEGH works with other societies and interest groups to further a better understanding of human interaction.  SEGH members receive a discount against SEGH conference fees.

SEGH has strong links to training and research projects, with a strong emphasis on encouraging young scientists.  Opportunities are developed to enable young researchers to participate in events where experienced professionals from industry and the public sector and academics meet under informal conditions to discuss research findings and relevant gaps in knowledge.

SEGH supports its own cutting edge, impact factor journal: Environmental Geochemistry and Health. In cooperation with Springer, SEGH members can enjoy online access to the journal.

You are warmly invited to join us as returning members or new applicants to the SEGH community.

Full membership: £40, Retired Membership: £22, Student membership: £22 

(Both Full, Retired and Student membership with EGH on-line journal access - please note this includes access to the back catalogue)

Membership without EGH journal: £20

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Membership runs from January to January.  You will need to renew each year using the Join Us button on the homepage and re-enter your details to ensure we have up-to-date information.

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SEGH Events

SEGH 2015 31st International Conference

Bratislava

22 June 2015

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Members can keep in touch with their colleagues through short news and events articles of interest to the SEGH community.

Science in the News

Latest on-line papers from the SEGH journal: Environmental Geochemistry and Health

  • Geospatial association between adverse birth outcomes and arsenic in groundwater in New Hampshire, USA 2014-10-19

    Abstract

    There is increasing evidence of the role of arsenic in the etiology of adverse human reproductive outcomes. Because drinking water can be a major source of arsenic to pregnant women, the effect of arsenic exposure through drinking water on human birth may be revealed by a geospatial association between arsenic concentration in groundwater and birth problems, particularly in a region where private wells substantially account for water supply, like New Hampshire, USA. We calculated town-level rates of preterm birth and term low birth weight (term LBW) for New Hampshire, by using data for 1997–2009 stratified by maternal age. We smoothed the rates by using a locally weighted averaging method to increase the statistical stability. The town-level groundwater arsenic probability values are from three GIS data layers generated by the US Geological Survey: probability of local groundwater arsenic concentration >1 µg/L, probability >5 µg/L, and probability >10 µg/L. We calculated Pearson’s correlation coefficients (r) between the reproductive outcomes (preterm birth and term LBW) and the arsenic probability values, at both state and county levels. For preterm birth, younger mothers (maternal age <20) have a statewide r = 0.70 between the rates smoothed with a threshold = 2,000 births and the town mean arsenic level based on the data of probability >10 µg/L; for older mothers, r = 0.19 when the smoothing threshold = 3,500; a majority of county level r values are positive based on the arsenic data of probability >10 µg/L. For term LBW, younger mothers (maternal age <25) have a statewide r = 0.44 between the rates smoothed with a threshold = 3,500 and town minimum arsenic concentration based on the data of probability >1 µg/L; for older mothers, r = 0.14 when the rates are smoothed with a threshold = 1,000 births and also adjusted by town median household income in 1999, and the arsenic values are the town minimum based on probability >10 µg/L. At the county level for younger mothers, positive r values prevail, but for older mothers, it is a mix. For both birth problems, the several most populous counties—with 60–80 % of the state’s population and clustering at the southwest corner of the state—are largely consistent in having a positive r across different smoothing thresholds. We found evident spatial associations between the two adverse human reproductive outcomes and groundwater arsenic in New Hampshire, USA. However, the degree of associations and their sensitivity to different representations of arsenic level are variable. Generally, preterm birth has a stronger spatial association with groundwater arsenic than term LBW, suggesting an inconsistency in the impact of arsenic on the two reproductive outcomes. For both outcomes, younger maternal age has stronger spatial associations with groundwater arsenic.

  • The arsenic contamination of rice in Guangdong Province, the most economically dynamic provinces of China: arsenic speciation and its potential health risk 2014-10-07

    Abstract

    Rice is a staple food in China, but it may contain toxic heavy metals. Hence, the concentrations of arsenic (As) species (AsIII, AsV, MMA and DMA) were evaluated in 260 rice samples from 13 cities of Guangdong Province, the most economically dynamic provinces of China. The levels of sum concentrations of As species in rice samples varied from non-detect to 225.58 ng g−1, with an average value of 57.27 ng g−1. The mean concentrations of the major As species detected in rice samples were in the order AsIII (34.77 ng g−1) > AsV (9.34 ng g−1) > DMA (8.33 ng g−1) > MMA (4.82 ng g−1). The rice samples of Guangdong Province were categorized as inorganic As type. Significant geographical variation of As speciation existed in rice samples of 13 cities of Guangdong Province by chi-square test (p < 0.05). The average human weekly intakes of inorganic As via rice consumption in Guangdong Province, southern China, were 1.91 µg kg−1 body weight. Hazard quotients of total As via rice consumption of adults in 13 cities ranged from 0.06 to 0.30, indicating the As contents in rice from Guangdong Province had no potential adverse impact on human health.

  • Selected papers from the 29th SEGH Conference on Environmental Geochemistry and Health 2014-10-01