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Join a lively, research focussed network, which values and encourages interdisciplinary work across the spectrum of interactions between humans and the environment. 

SEGH has established a series of international conferences and meetings and promotes task force activities to address research and knowledge gaps in the area.  SEGH works with other societies and interest groups to further a better understanding of human interaction.  SEGH members receive a discount against SEGH conference fees.

SEGH has strong links to training and research projects, with a strong emphasis on encouraging young scientists.  Opportunities are developed to enable young researchers to participate in events where experienced professionals from industry and the public sector and academics meet under informal conditions to discuss research findings and relevant gaps in knowledge.

SEGH supports its own cutting edge, impact factor journal: Environmental Geochemistry and Health. In cooperation with Springer, SEGH members can enjoy online access to the journal.

You are warmly invited to join us as returning members or new applicants to the SEGH community.

Full membership: £40, Retired Membership: £22, Student membership: £22 

(Both Full, Retired and Student membership with EGH on-line journal access - please note this includes access to the back catalogue)

Membership without EGH journal: £20

Secure payments are handled by SagePay and will be charged in £GBP, but you will be billed in your local currency.

Membership runs from January to January.  You will need to renew each year using the Join Us button on the homepage and re-enter your details to ensure we have up-to-date information.

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SEGH Events

SEGH 2015 31st International Conference

Bratislava

22 June 2015

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Members can keep in touch with their colleagues through short news and events articles of interest to the SEGH community.

Science in the News

Latest on-line papers from the SEGH journal: Environmental Geochemistry and Health

  • Correlation of cadmium and aluminum in blood samples of kidney disorder patients with drinking water and tobacco smoking: related health risk 2015-05-24

    Abstract

    The combined exposure to aluminum (Al) and cadmium (Cd) causes more pronounced adverse health effects on humans. The kidneys are the main organs affected by internal exposure to Cd and Al via food and non-food items. The objective of present study was to measure the Al and Cd concentrations in cigarettes tobacco (branded and non-branded) and drinking water (domestic treated, ground and lake water) samples in southern part of Pakistan, to assess the risk due to ingestion of water and inhalation of cigarettes smoke containing high concentrations of both elements. The study population (kidney disorder and healthy) divided into two group based on consuming lake and ground water, while smoking non-branded cigarette as exposed, while drinking domestic treated water and smoking branded cigarette as non-exposed. Electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry was used to determined Cd and Al concentrations in tobacco, drinking water and blood samples. The resulted data indicated that the levels of Al and Cd in lake and underground water were higher than the permissible limit in drinking water recommended by the World Health Organization. The biochemical parameters of exposed and referent patients, especially urinary N-acetyl-h-glucosaminidase, were used as a biomarkers of kidney disorder. Exposed kidney disorder patients have higher levels of Cd and Al than the exposed referents subjects, while difference was significant when compared to resulted data of non-exposed patients and referents (p = 0.01–0.001). The pearson correlation showed positive correlation between both toxic element concentrations in water, cigarettes versus blood samples of exposed subjects (r = 0.20–0.67 and 0.71–0.82), while lower values were observed for non-exposed subjects (r = 0.123–0.423 and 0.331–0.425), respectively.

  • Occurrence and hydrogeochemical characteristics of high-fluoride groundwater in Xiji County, southern part of Ningxia Province, China 2015-05-20

    Abstract

    High-F groundwater is widely distributed in Xiji County, which endangers the safety of drinking water. In order to evaluate the key factors controlling the origin and geochemical mechanisms of F enrichment in groundwater at Xiji County, one hundred and five groundwater samples and sixty-two sediment samples were collected. Fluoride concentration in the groundwater samples ranged from 0.2 to 3.01 mg/L (mean 1.13 mg/L), with 17 % exceeding the WHO drinking water guideline value of 1.5 mg/L and 48 % exceeding the Chinese drinking water guideline value of 1.0 mg/L. High-F groundwaters were characterized by hydrochemical types of Na–HCO3 and Na–SO4·Cl, which were found in Quaternary sediment aquifer and in Tertiary clastic aquifer, respectively. Conditions favorable for F enrichment in groundwater included weakly alkaline pH (7.2–8.9), low concentration of Ca2+, and high concentrations of HCO3 and Na+. Calcite and fluorite were the main minerals controlling F concentration in groundwaters. The hydrolysis of F-bearing minerals in aquifer sediments was the more important process for F release in Tertiary clastic aquifer, which was facilitated by long residence time of groundwater, in comparison with Quaternary sediment aquifer. Cation exchange would also play important roles, which removed Ca2+ and Mg2+ and led to more free mobility of F in groundwater and permitted dissolution of fluorite, especially in Tertiary clastic aquifer. However, evapotranspiration and competing adsorption of B and HCO3 were the more important processes for F enrichment in Quaternary groundwater. Groundwater in Lower Cretaceous aquifer had relatively low F concentration, which was considered to be the potential drinking water resource.

  • Impact of biochar produced from post-harvest residue on the adsorption behavior of diesel oil on loess soil 2015-05-17

    Abstract

    The primary objective of this study was to investigate the effect of biochar, produced from wheat residue at different temperatures, on the adsorption of diesel oil by loess soil. Kinetic and equilibrium data were processed to understand the adsorption mechanism of diesel by biochar-affected loess soil; dynamic and thermodynamic adsorption experiments were conducted to characterize this adsorption. The surface features and chemical structure of biochar, modified at varying pyrolytic temperatures, were investigated using surface scanning electron microscopy and Fourier transform infrared analysis. The kinetic data showed that the adsorption of diesel oil onto loess soil could be described by a pseudo-second-order kinetic model, with the rate-controlling step being intraparticle diffusion. However, in the presence of biochar, boundary layer control and intraparticle diffusion were both involved in the adsorption. Besides, the adsorption equilibrium data were well described by the Freundlich isothermal model. The saturated adsorption capacity weakened as temperature increased, suggesting a spontaneous exothermic process. Thermodynamic parameter analysis showed that adsorption was mainly a physical process and was enhanced by chemical adsorption. The adsorption capacity of loess soil for diesel oil was weakened with increasing pH. The biochar produced by pyrolytic wheat residue increased the adsorption behavior of petroleum pollutants in loess soil.