Become a member of SEGH

Membership

Join a lively, research focussed network, which values and encourages interdisciplinary work across the spectrum of interactions between humans and the environment. 

SEGH has established a series of international conferences and meetings and promotes task force activities to address research and knowledge gaps in the area.  SEGH works with other societies and interest groups to further a better understanding of human interaction.  SEGH members receive a discount against SEGH conference fees.

SEGH has strong links to training and research projects, with a strong emphasis on encouraging young scientists.  Opportunities are developed to enable young researchers to participate in events where experienced professionals from industry and the public sector and academics meet under informal conditions to discuss research findings and relevant gaps in knowledge.

SEGH supports its own cutting edge, impact factor journal: Environmental Geochemistry and Health. In cooperation with Springer, SEGH members can enjoy online access to the journal.

You are warmly invited to join us as returning members or new applicants to the SEGH community.

Full membership: £45, Retired Membership: £25, Student membership: £25 

(Both Full, Retired and Student membership with EGH on-line journal access - please note this includes access to the back catalogue)

Membership without EGH journal: £25

Secure payments are handled by SagePay and will be charged in £GBP, but you will be billed in your local currency.

Membership runs from January to January.  You will need to renew each year using the Join Us button on the homepage and re-enter your details to ensure we have up-to-date information.

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Members can keep in touch with their colleagues through short news and events articles of interest to the SEGH community.

Science in the News

Latest on-line papers from the SEGH journal: Environmental Geochemistry and Health

  • Study of the interactions of dissolved organic matter with zinc ion and the impact of competitive metal ions (Ca 2+ and Mg 2+ ) by in situ absorbance 2017-06-22

    Abstract

    The bioavailability and toxicity of zinc to aquatic life depend on dissolved organic matter (DOM), such as Suwannee River Fulvic Acid (SRFA), which plays an important role in the speciation of zinc. This study examined reactions of SRFA with zinc at different concentrations from pH 3.0 to 9.0, and competitive binding of calcium/magnesium and zinc to SRFA at pH 6.0, using in situ absorbance. Interactions of Zn2+ with SRFA chromophores were evidenced by the emergence of features in Zn-differential spectra. Among all Zn2+–SRFA systems, dominant peaks, located at 235, 275 and 385 nm, and the highest intensity at 235 nm indicated the replacement of protons by the bound Zn2+. The Zn2+ binding with SRFA could be quantified by calculating the changes of the slopes of Zn-differential log-transformed absorbance in the wavelength range of 350–400 nm (denoted as DS350–400) and by comparing the experimental data with predictions using the Non-Ideal Competitive Adsorption (NICA–Donnan) model. DS350–400 was correlated well with the bound Zn2+ concentrations predicted by NICA–Donnan model with or without Ca2+ or Mg2+. Ca2+ and Mg2+ only affect intensity of the Zn-differential and Zn-differential log-transformed absorbance, not shape. In situ absorbance can be used to gain further information about Men+–DOM interactions in the presence of various metals.

  • Blood concentrations of lead, cadmium, mercury and their association with biomarkers of DNA oxidative damage in preschool children living in an e-waste recycling area 2017-06-16

    Abstract

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS)-induced DNA damage occurs in heavy metal exposure, but the simultaneous effect on DNA repair is unknown. We investigated the influence of co-exposure of lead (Pb), cadmium (Cd), and mercury (Hg) on 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) and human repair enzyme 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase (hOGG1) mRNA levels in exposed children to evaluate the imbalance of DNA damage and repair. Children within the age range of 3–6 years from a primitive electronic waste (e-waste) recycling town were chosen as participants to represent a heavy metal-exposed population. 8-OHdG in the children’s urine was assessed for heavy metal-induced oxidative effects, and the hOGG1 mRNA level in their blood represented the DNA repair ability of the children. Among the children surveyed, 88.14% (104/118) had a blood Pb level >5 μg/dL, 22.03% (26/118) had a blood Cd level >1 μg/dL, and 62.11% (59/95) had a blood Hg level >10 μg/dL. Having an e-waste workshop near the house was a risk factor contributing to high blood Pb (r s  = 0.273, p < 0.01), while Cd and Hg exposure could have come from other contaminant sources. Preschool children of fathers who had a college or university education had significantly lower 8-OHdG levels (median 242.76 ng/g creatinine, range 154.62–407.79 ng/g creatinine) than did children of fathers who had less education (p = 0.035). However, we did not observe a significant difference in the mRNA expression levels of hOGG1 between the different variables. Compared with children having low lead exposure (quartile 1), the children with high Pb exposure (quartiles 2, 3, and 4) had significantly higher 8-OHdG levels (β Q2 = 0.362, 95% CI 0.111–0.542; β Q3 = 0.347, 95% CI 0.103–0.531; β Q4 = 0.314, 95% CI 0.087–0.557). Associations between blood Hg levels and 8-OHdG were less apparent. Compared with low levels of blood Hg (quartile 1), elevated blood Hg levels (quartile 2) were associated with higher 8-OHdG levels (β Q2 = 0.236, 95% CI 0.039–0.406). Compared with children having low lead exposure (quartile 1), the children with high Pb exposure (quartiles 2, 3, and 4) had significantly higher 8-OHdG levels.

  • Effect of biosolid hydrochar on toxicity to earthworms and brine shrimp 2017-06-15

    Abstract

    The hydrothermal carbonization of sewage sludge has been studied as an alternative technique for the conversion of sewage sludge into value-added products, such as soil amendments. We tested the toxicity of biosolid hydrochar (Sewchar) to earthworms. Additionally, the toxicity of Sewchar process water filtrate with and without pH adjustment was assessed, using brine shrimps as a model organism. For a Sewchar application of 40 Mg ha−1, the earthworms significantly preferred the side of the vessel with the reference soil (control) over side of the vessel with the Sewchar treatments. There was no acute toxicity of Sewchar to earthworms within the studied concentration range (up to 80 Mg ha−1). Regarding the Sewchar process water filtrate, the median lethal concentration (LC50) to the shrimps was 8.1% for the treatments in which the pH was not adjusted and 54.8% for the treatments in which the pH was adjusted to 8.5. The lethality to the shrimps significantly increased as the amount of Sewchar process water filtrate increased. In the future, specific toxic substances in Sewchar and its process water filtrate, as well as their interactions with soil properties and their impacts on organisms, should be elucidated. Additionally, it should be identified whether the amount of the toxic compounds satisfies the corresponding legal requirements for the safe application of Sewchar and its process water filtrate.