Become a member of SEGH

Membership

Join a lively, research focussed network, which values and encourages interdisciplinary work across the spectrum of interactions between humans and the environment. 

SEGH has established a series of international conferences and meetings and promotes task force activities to address research and knowledge gaps in the area.  SEGH works with other societies and interest groups to further a better understanding of human interaction.  SEGH members receive a discount against SEGH conference fees.

SEGH has strong links to training and research projects, with a strong emphasis on encouraging young scientists.  Opportunities are developed to enable young researchers to participate in events where experienced professionals from industry and the public sector and academics meet under informal conditions to discuss research findings and relevant gaps in knowledge.

SEGH supports its own cutting edge, impact factor journal: Environmental Geochemistry and Health. In cooperation with Springer, SEGH members can enjoy online access to the journal.

You are warmly invited to join us as returning members or new applicants to the SEGH community.

Full membership: £40, Retired Membership: £22, Student membership: £22 

(Both Full, Retired and Student membership with EGH on-line journal access - please note this includes access to the back catalogue)

Membership without EGH journal: £20

Secure payments are handled by SagePay and will be charged in £GBP, but you will be billed in your local currency.

Membership runs from January to January.  You will need to renew each year using the Join Us button on the homepage and re-enter your details to ensure we have up-to-date information.

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Members can keep in touch with their colleagues through short news and events articles of interest to the SEGH community.

Science in the News

Latest on-line papers from the SEGH journal: Environmental Geochemistry and Health

  • Urinary stones as a novel matrix for human biomonitoring of toxic and essential elements 2015-03-04

    Abstract

    Monitoring of body burden of toxic elements is usually based on analysis of concentration of particular elements in blood, urine and/or hair. Analysis of these matrices, however, predominantly reflects short- or medium-term exposure to trace elements or pollutants. In this work, urinary stones were investigated as a matrix for monitoring long-term exposure to toxic and essential elements. A total of 431 samples of urinary calculi were subjected to mineralogical and elemental analysis by infrared spectroscopy and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. The effect of mineralogical composition of the stones and other parameters such as sex, age and geographical location on contents of trace and minor elements is presented. Our results demonstrate the applicability of such approach and confirm that the analysis of urinary calculi can be helpful in providing complementary information on human exposure to trace metals and their excretion. Analysis of whewellite stones (calcium oxalate monohydrate) with content of phosphorus <0.6 % has been proved to be a promising tool for biomonitoring of trace and minor elements.

  • A novel method of microwave heating mixed liquid-assisted regeneration of V 2 O 5 –WO 3 /TiO 2 commercial SCR catalysts 2015-03-03

    Abstract

    An experimental study on the regeneration of deactivated SCR catalysts was carried out using a microwave-assisted method containing three steps of washing with mixed liquid of ethanol and water, impregnating, and drying. After the regeneration treatment, NO conversion at 320 °C increased from 39 to 90 % and vanadium content increased by 62.2 %, which were much higher than those regenerated by the traditional method. The more impregnated vanadium was due to the fact that the rapid evaporation of mixed liquid inside the catalyst channels led to the enlargement of surface areas by creating more pores on the catalysts. Meanwhile, with the increasing concentrations of ethanol, the heating rate of the mixed liquid increased, and the volume after complete evaporation of the mixed liquid was gradually reduced. Since higher heating rate and lager volume after the liquid evaporation could help to create more pores, therefore, when the volume ratio of ethanol/mixed solution was 20 %, the catalyst obtained the maximum specific surface area, which significantly increased to ca. 123 % compared with the deactivated catalyst. In addition, the catalyst dried by microwave exhibited better catalytic activity than that dried in conventional oven. Therefore, this method showed great potential in industrial applications.

  • Assessment of total and organic vanadium levels and their bioaccumulation in edible sea cucumbers: tissues distribution, inter-species-specific, locational differences and seasonal variations 2015-03-03

    Abstract

    The objective of this study is to investigate the levels, inter-species-specific, locational differences and seasonal variations of vanadium in sea cucumbers and to validate further several potential factors controlling the distribution of metals in sea cucumbers. Vanadium levels were evaluated in samples of edible sea cucumbers and were demonstrated exhibit differences in different seasons, species and sampling sites. High vanadium concentrations were measured in the sea cucumbers, and all of the vanadium detected was in an organic form. Mean vanadium concentrations were considerably higher in the blood (sea cucumber) than in the other studied tissues. The highest concentration of vanadium (2.56 μg g−1), as well as a higher degree of organic vanadium (85.5 %), was observed in the Holothuria scabra samples compared with all other samples. Vanadium levels in Apostichopus japonicus from Bohai Bay and Yellow Sea have marked seasonal variations. Average values of 1.09 μg g−1 of total vanadium and 0.79 μg g−1 of organic vanadium were obtained in various species of sea cucumbers. Significant positive correlations between vanadium in the seawater and V org in the sea cucumber (r = 81.67 %, p = 0.00), as well as between vanadium in the sediment and V org in the sea cucumber (r = 77.98 %, p = 0.00), were observed. Vanadium concentrations depend on the seasons (salinity, temperature), species, sampling sites and seawater environment (seawater, sediment). Given the adverse toxicological effects of inorganic vanadium and positive roles in controlling the development of diabetes in humans, a regular monitoring programme of vanadium content in edible sea cucumbers can be recommended.