• SEGH

    Diverse scientific fields and multidisciplinary expertise brought together within an international community.

  • SEGH

    Diverse scientific fields and multidisciplinary expertise brought together within an international community

  • SEGH

    Diverse scientific fields and multidisciplinary expertise brought together within an international community.

  • SEGH

    Diverse scientific fields and multidisciplinary expertise brought together within an international community.

  • SEGH

    Diverse scientific fields and multidisciplinary expertise brought together within an international community.

  • SEGH

    Diverse scientific fields and multidisciplinary expertise brought together within an international community.

  • SEGH

    Diverse scientific fields and multidisciplinary expertise brought together within an international community.

  • SEGH

    Diverse scientific fields and multidisciplinary expertise brought together within an international community.

  • SEGH

    Geochemistry for Sustainable Development SEGH 2018 Vic Falls Zambia

  • SEGH

    Diverse scientific fields and multidisciplinary expertise brought together within an international community.

  • SEGH

    SEGH 2018 VicFalls Zambia

Society for Environmental Geochemistry and Health

SEGH was established in 1971 to provide a forum for scientists from various disciplines to work together in understanding the interaction between the geochemical environment and the health of plants, animals, and humans. We recognise the importance of interdisciplinary research. SEGH members represent expertise in a diverse range of scientific fields, such as biology, engineering, geology, hydrology, epidemiology, chemistry, medicine, nutrition, and toxicology.

 

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SEGH Articles

SEGH Data Privacy Policy

| May 2018

We are preparing for new General Data Protection Regulations (GDPR). Please read further for SEGH handling of member information.  continue reading...

SEGH International Conference, Guangzhou, China 2017

| May 2018

The 33rd International conference of the Society for Environmental Geochemistry and Health (SEGH 2017) was successfully held in Guangzhou, China  continue reading...

Enhancing Nutrient Use Efficiency: The Role of Specialty Fertilizers

| March 2018

The International Fertilizer Association (IFA) held its Task Force and Strategic Forum Meeting in Zurich, Switzerland on Nov 13-15, 2017. The purpose of the meeting was to discuss and prepare the Fertilizer Industry for the challenges foreseen by 2030 along with a special focus on Enhancing Nutrient Use Efficiency: The Role of Specialty Fertilizers. Dr Munir Zia provides SEGH readers with a brief overview of this topic.   continue reading...

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Science in the News

Latest on-line papers from the SEGH journal: Environmental Geochemistry and Health

  • Risk assessment of high concentrations of molybdenum in forage 2018-06-19

    Abstract

    Molybdenum is toxic to ruminants when present in high levels in forage, causing physiological copper deficiency. A critical level for ruminants is 3–10 mg Mo kg−1 dry matter. The average Mo level varies considerably between different arable soils, depending mainly on soil parent material. This study investigated the possibility of using various existing sources of geospatial information (geophysical, biogeochemical and soil chemical) to develop a geography-based risk assessment system. Forage samples (n = 173) were collected in 2006–2007. Three types of national geoscientific datasets were tested: (1) SEPA topsoil, comprising data from arable land within the Swedish environmental monitoring programme; (2) SGU biogeochemical, containing data from aquatic plant root material collected in small streams; and (3) SGU geophysical, consisting of data from airborne gamma-ray scanning. The digital postcode area map was used for geocoding, with Mo concentrations in forage assigned to arable parts of the corresponding postcode area. By combining this with the three national geoscientific databases, it was possible to construct a risk map using fuzzy classification depicting High-risk, Intermediate-risk, Low-risk and Very-low-risk areas. The map was validated using 42 randomly selected samples. All samples but one with Mo > 3 mg kg−1 were found in postcode areas designated High risk. Thus, the risk map developed seems to be useful as a decision support system on where standard forage analyses need to be supplemented with Mo analyses.

  • Evaluation of multiple water quality indices for drinking and irrigation purposes for the Karoon river, Iran 2018-06-16

    Abstract

    The main purpose of this study was to evaluate the water quality of the Karoon river, which is a main river in Iran country. For this purpose, hydrochemical analyses of a database that maintained by the Water Resources Authority of Khuzestan Province, Iran’s Ministry of Energy, were carried out. These data were compared with the maximum permissible limit values recommended by World Health Organization and Food and Agriculture Organization water standards for drinking and agricultural purposes, respectively. Also in this regard, multiple indices of water quality were utilized. However, not all indices gave similar rankings for water quality. According to the USSL diagram and Kelly ratio, Karoon’s water quality is not suitable for irrigation purposes due to high salinity and moderate alkalinity. However, the results of the magnesium hazard analysis suggested that water quality for irrigation is acceptable. A Piper diagram illustrated that the most dominant water types during the 15 years of the study were Na–Cl and Na–SO4. The mineral saturation index also indicated that Na–Cl is the dominant water type. The water quality for drinking purpose was evaluated using a Schoeller diagram and water quality index (WQI). According to the computed WQI ranging from 111.9 to 194.0, the Karoon’s water in the Khuzestan plain can be categorized as “poor water” for drinking purposes. Based on hydrochemical characteristics, years 2000–2007 and 2008–2014 were categorized into two clusters illustrating a decline in water quality between the two time periods.

  • Impact of a severe flood on large-scale contamination of arable soils by potentially toxic elements (Serbia) 2018-06-16

    Abstract

    Extreme flooding in May, 2014 affected the sub-catchments of six major rivers in Serbia. The goal of the study was to evaluate the contents of potentially toxic elements (PTEs) As, Cd, Pb, Cr, Ni, Cu, and Zn in flood sediments and arable soils within the affected sub-catchments using regulatory guidelines and background levels. The sub-catchment of West Morava was selected to assess the degree of sediments and soils contamination and environmental risk [using the Pollution index (Pi), Enrichment factor, Geo-accumulation index, and Potential ecological risk index (PERI)] as well as to identify main PTEs sources by Principal component (PCA) and cluster analysis. Contents of Ni, Cr, As, Pb, and Cu above both guidelines and background levels, and of Zn and Cd above background levels were detected in the sediments and soils from all the sub-catchments. Pi indicted that about 95% of the soils and sediments were extremely polluted by Ni and about 65% slightly polluted by Cr, whereas about 90% were not polluted by As, Cd, Pb, Cu, or Zn. Ef indicated minor to moderate enrichment of the soils and sediments by Ni, and Cr. PCA differentiated a geogenic origin of Ni, Cr, As, and Pb, a mixed origin of Cd and Zn, and a predominantly anthropogenic origin of Cu. PERI of the soils and sediments suggested a low overall multi-element ecological risk. The ecological risk of the individual elements (E r i ) for soils was Zn < Cr < Pb < Ni < Cu < As < Cd.