SEGH Events

30th SEGH Conference

30 June 2014
Newcastle, UK
Northumbria University, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, UK. 30th June to 4th July 2014 International Conference of the Society for Environmental Geochemistry and Health

Dear colleagues,

On behalf of the Organizing Committee of the 30th International SEGH conference (European Section), I would like to extend a warm welcome and invite you to join us at Northumbria University, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, UK, 30th June – 4th July, 2014.

This annual conference of the Society for Environmental Geochemistry and Health provides a forum for international scientists, consultants, regulatory authorities and other practitioners (public health / environmental health) with an interest in the links between environment and health and working in the broad area of environmental geochemistry. For the 30thSEGH we are keen to receive contributions on three core themes and two special sessions:

  •           Theme 1 - Chemical bioavailability and bioaccessibility
  •           Theme 2 - Risk Assessment, environmental exposure and health
  •           Theme 3 - Air & dust pollution and human health
  •           Special Session 1 - ‘Hydraulic Fracturing (Fracking) and Health’
  •           Special Session 2 - ‘Environmental iodine and the deficiency disorders’

We would also welcome submission of papers for any topics relevant to the aims of the Society.

 

The conference venue is the city campus of Northumbria University, in the heart of the city of Newcastle-upon-Tyne, North-East England, UK.

 

Abstract submission will open on December 2nd, 2013.

Abstract submission deadline is March 3rd, 2014

 

For further details please click here

 

Please save these key dates in your diary. More information will follow...

We look forward to welcoming you to Newcastle in 2014.

 

Best Regards,

Jane Entwistle [SEGH 2014 Chair]

 

Photographs courtesy of John Tan, Northumbria University

 

Dr Jane Entwistle

Head of Department,

Geography,

Northumbria University

Newcastle upon Tyne

NE1 8ST

Tel: 00 44 (0)191 227 3017  e-mail: jane.entwistle@northumbria.ac.uk

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Science in the News

Latest on-line papers from the SEGH journal: Environmental Geochemistry and Health

  • Fluoride concentrations in the pineal gland, brain and bone of goosander (Mergus merganser) and its prey in Odra River estuary in Poland 2014-04-18

    Abstract

    The aim of the study was to investigate fluoride concentrations in bone, brain and pineal gland of goosander Mergus merganser wintering in the Odra estuary (Poland) as well as in fish originating from its digestive tract. The fluoride concentrations were determined with potentiometric method. Medians of concentrations in goosander had the highest and the lowest values in pineal gland and brain (>760 and <190 mg/kg, respectively). Fluoride concentration in the pineal gland was significantly greater than in the bone and the brain of the duck. In fish, the fluoride concentration ranged from 37 to 640 mg/kg and significant correlation was revealed between the fluoride concentration and fish weight and length. Based on own results and data of other authors, a daily fluoride intake by the goosander in the Odra estuary was estimated at 15 mg. So high fluoride concentrations like in the duck have not been found in mammal brains.

  • Release of mobile forms of hazardous elements from glassworks fly ash into soils 2014-04-17

    Abstract

    The release of hazardous elements from the wastes of high-temperature processes represents a risk to the environment. We focused on the alteration of fly ash (FA) from glassworks collected from an electrostatic filter. FA contains elevated concentrations of Zn and Ba, among other elements. Overtime, small amounts of FA have been emitted from the factory and settled into the surrounding environment (soil). In order to assess the possible risks to the environment, samples of FA were placed in small nylon bags and deposited in 11 different soil horizons (containing diverse vegetation cover such as spruce and beech and also unforested areas). Samples of the FA in bags were exposed in the soils for 1 year. Then, the bags were collected, and the exposed soils in the direct vicinity of the FA bags were sampled. The total concentrations of Zn and Ba in the FA, as well as in the soil samples (original and exposed), were determined by ICP MS. The “mobile fraction” was determined as the exchangeable (acid extractable) fraction of the modified BCR sequential extraction procedure (SEP). The SEP results indicate that Zn and Ba may pose a potential environmental risk. Their concentrations in the first, most mobile, and bioavailable fraction increased in all the exposed soils. The most significant increases were observed in the upper soil horizons (litter and A horizon). The risk to the environment was evaluated on the basis of the Risk Assessment Code.

  • Selected papers from the 29th SEGH Conference on Environmental Geochemistry and Health 2014-04-16