SEGH Events

30th SEGH Conference

30 June 2014
Newcastle, UK
Northumbria University, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, UK. 30th June to 4th July 2014 International Conference of the Society for Environmental Geochemistry and Health

Dear colleagues,

On behalf of the Organizing Committee of the 30th International SEGH conference (European Section), I would like to extend a warm welcome and invite you to join us at Northumbria University, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, UK, 30th June – 4th July, 2014.

This annual conference of the Society for Environmental Geochemistry and Health provides a forum for international scientists, consultants, regulatory authorities and other practitioners (public health / environmental health) with an interest in the links between environment and health and working in the broad area of environmental geochemistry. For the 30thSEGH we are keen to receive contributions on three core themes and two special sessions:

  •           Theme 1 - Chemical bioavailability and bioaccessibility
  •           Theme 2 - Risk Assessment, environmental exposure and health
  •           Theme 3 - Air & dust pollution and human health
  •           Special Session 1 - ‘Hydraulic Fracturing (Fracking) and Health’
  •           Special Session 2 - ‘Environmental iodine and the deficiency disorders’

We would also welcome submission of papers for any topics relevant to the aims of the Society.

 

The conference venue is the city campus of Northumbria University, in the heart of the city of Newcastle-upon-Tyne, North-East England, UK.

 

Abstract submission will open on December 2nd, 2013.

Abstract submission deadline is March 3rd, 2014

 

For further details please click here

 

Please save these key dates in your diary. More information will follow...

We look forward to welcoming you to Newcastle in 2014.

 

Best Regards,

Jane Entwistle [SEGH 2014 Chair]

 

Photographs courtesy of John Tan, Northumbria University

 

Dr Jane Entwistle

Head of Department,

Geography,

Northumbria University

Newcastle upon Tyne

NE1 8ST

Tel: 00 44 (0)191 227 3017  e-mail: jane.entwistle@northumbria.ac.uk

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Science in the News

Latest on-line papers from the SEGH journal: Environmental Geochemistry and Health

  • Preface: Selected papers from the 30th SEGH Conference on Environmental Geochemistry and Health 2015-08-01
  • Measuring the solid-phase fractionation of lead in urban and rural soils using a combination of geochemical survey data and chemical extractions 2015-08-01

    Abstract

    The study used 276 urban soils and 447 rural soils collected from in and around the UK town of Northampton and focussed on the fractionation of Pb. The Pb fractionation obtained from total element data was compared to the fractionation of Pb in a subset of 10 urban soils obtained using a sequential extraction method. The fractionation of the Pb from the total element data and from the sequential extractions was estimated using a self-modelling mixture resolution statistical model. The bioaccessibility of Pb in a subset of 50 of the urban soils, as measured using the unified BARGE method, was shown to be quantitatively linked with Pb fractionation from both the total element and the sequential extraction data. Three intrinsic soil components from the regional total element data model and one physico-chemical component from the sequential extraction data model were identified as the sources of bioaccessible Pb. The source of bioaccessible Pb in both rural and urban soils was tentatively identified as a fine-grained pyromorphite mineral.

  • Arsenic hazard in Cambodian rice from a market-based survey with a case study of Preak Russey village, Kandal Province 2015-08-01

    Abstract

    This study comprises a market-based survey to assess the arsenic (As) hazard of Cambodian rice, encompassing rice from seven Cambodian provinces, comparisons with rice imported from China, Vietnam and Thailand, and assessments of 15 rice varieties. Rice samples (n = 157) were collected from four large markets in Kandal Province and analysed for As using inductively coupled mass spectrometry. The mean As concentration for Cambodian rice (0.185 µg g−1, range 0.047–0.771 µg g−1) was higher than that for imported rice from Vietnam and Thailand (0.162 and 0.157 µg g−1, respectively) with mean As concentrations highest in rice from Prey Veng Province resulting in a daily dose of 1.77 µg kg−1 b.w. (body weight) d−1. Between unmilled rice varieties, Cambodian-grown White Sticky Rice had the highest mean As concentration (0.234 µg g−1), whilst White Sticky Rice produced in Thailand had the lowest (0.125 µg g−1), suggesting that localised conditions have greater bearing over rice As concentrations than differences in As uptake between individual varieties themselves. A rice and water consumption survey for 15 respondents in the village of Preak Russey revealed mean consumption rates of 522 g d−1 of rice and 1.9 L d−1 of water. At water As concentrations >1000 µg L−1, the relative contribution to the daily dose from rice is low. When water As concentrations are lowered to 50 µg L−1, daily doses from rice and water are both generally below the 3.0 µg kg−1 b.w. d−1 benchmark daily limit for a 0.5 % increase in lung cancer, yet when combined they exceeded this value in all but three respondents.