SEGH Events

7th International Workshop on Chemical Bioavailability

04 November 2013
British Geological Survey, Nottingham, UK
The 7th IWCB is a premier event for highlighting research in chemical bioavailability in the environment.

On behalf of the International Organising Committee, the British Geological Survey (BGS) and the University of Nottingham invite everyone to discuss and exchange new and emerging scientific breakthroughs in chemical bioavailability at the 7th International Workshop on Chemical Bioavailability (IWCB). This series is emerging as a premier event for highlighting research in chemical bioavailability in the environment.  We hope that the workshop will provide the opportunity for delegates to exchange knowledge and experience and to further develop a common view on contaminant bioavailability.

Why attend?

  • network with leading figures in the field
  • visit the exhibition to discover new products and services to enhance your research

Call for papers

We invite you to submit an abstract for an oral or poster presentation.  Please use the template on our webpage http://www.bgs.ac.uk/news/events/bioavailabilityWorkshop/home.html and send your completed submission to Cbio7@bgs.ac.uk

 

Themes

  • analytical methodologies
  • models - QSAR for organic bioaccessibility, predictive, spatial, soil properties
  • reference materials
  • case studies on risk based land management
  • microbial bioavailability
  • essential nutrients
  • risk assessment and communication
  • plant uptake
  • chemomimetics
  • sentinel species
  • nano-materials
  • oral, inhalation and dermal pathways

 

Dr Mark Cave, British Geological Survey

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Science in the News

Latest on-line papers from the SEGH journal: Environmental Geochemistry and Health

  • Erratum to: Solid-state UV-MALDI mass spectrometric quantitation of fluroxypyr and triclopyr in soil 2016-10-01
  • Assessment of relative bioavailability of heavy metals in soil using in vivo mouse model and its implication for risk assessment compared with bioaccessibility using in vitro assay 2016-10-01

    Abstract

    There is limited study to simultaneously determine the relative bioavailability of heavy metals such as Cd, Pb, Cu, Cr(VI), and Ni in soil samples. In the present study, the bioaccessibility of heavy metals using in vitro assay was compared with the relative bioavailability of heavy metals using in vivo mouse model. The bioaccessibility of heavy metals ranged from 9.05 ± 0.97 % (Cr) to 42.8 ± 3.52 % (Cd). The uptake profile of heavy metals in soil and solution samples in mouse revealed that the uptake kinetics could be fitted to a two-compartment model. The relative bioavailability of heavy meals ranged from 34.8 ± 7.0 % (Ni) to 131 ± 20.3 % (Cu). Poor correlation between bioaccessibility and relative bioavailability of heavy metals was observed (r 2 = 0.11, p > 0.05). The relative bioavailability of heavy metals was significantly higher than the bioaccessibility of heavy metals (p < 0.05). The present study indicated that the in vitro digestion method should be carefully employed in risk assessment.

  • Chemical contamination of soils in the New York City area following Hurricane Sandy 2016-10-01

    Abstract

    This paper presents a unique data set of lead, arsenic, polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB), and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) concentrations in soil samples collected from the metropolitan New York City area in the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy. Initial samples were collected by citizen scientists recruited via social media, a relatively unusual approach for a sample collection project. Participants in the affected areas collected 63 usable samples from basements, gardens, roads, and beaches. Results indicate high levels of arsenic, lead, PCBs, and PAHs in an area approximately 800 feet south of the United States Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) Superfund site at Newtown Creek. A location adjacent to the Gowanus Canal, another Superfund site, was found to have high PCB concentrations. Areas of high PAH contamination tended to be near high traffic areas or next to sites of known contamination. While contamination as a direct result of Hurricane Sandy cannot be demonstrated conclusively, the presence of high levels of contamination close to known contamination sites, evidence for co-contamination, and decrease in number of samples containing measureable amounts of semi-volatile compounds from samples collected at similar locations 9 months after the storm suggest that contaminated particles may have migrated to residential areas as a result of flooding.