SEGH Events

7th International Workshop on Chemical Bioavailability

04 November 2013
British Geological Survey, Nottingham, UK
The 7th IWCB is a premier event for highlighting research in chemical bioavailability in the environment.

On behalf of the International Organising Committee, the British Geological Survey (BGS) and the University of Nottingham invite everyone to discuss and exchange new and emerging scientific breakthroughs in chemical bioavailability at the 7th International Workshop on Chemical Bioavailability (IWCB). This series is emerging as a premier event for highlighting research in chemical bioavailability in the environment.  We hope that the workshop will provide the opportunity for delegates to exchange knowledge and experience and to further develop a common view on contaminant bioavailability.

Why attend?

  • network with leading figures in the field
  • visit the exhibition to discover new products and services to enhance your research

Call for papers

We invite you to submit an abstract for an oral or poster presentation.  Please use the template on our webpage and send your completed submission to



  • analytical methodologies
  • models - QSAR for organic bioaccessibility, predictive, spatial, soil properties
  • reference materials
  • case studies on risk based land management
  • microbial bioavailability
  • essential nutrients
  • risk assessment and communication
  • plant uptake
  • chemomimetics
  • sentinel species
  • nano-materials
  • oral, inhalation and dermal pathways


Dr Mark Cave, British Geological Survey

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Science in the News

Latest on-line papers from the SEGH journal: Environmental Geochemistry and Health

  • Erratum to: Preliminary assessment of surface soil lead concentrations in Melbourne, Australia 2018-04-01
  • In vivo uptake of iodine from a Fucus serratus Linnaeus seaweed bath: does volatile iodine contribute? 2018-04-01


    Seaweed baths containing Fucus serratus Linnaeus are a rich source of iodine which has the potential to increase the urinary iodide concentration (UIC) of the bather. In this study, the range of total iodine concentration in seawater (22–105 µg L−1) and seaweed baths (808–13,734 µg L−1) was measured over 1 year. The seasonal trend shows minimum levels in summer (May–July) and maximum in winter (November–January). The bathwater pH was found to be acidic, average pH 5.9 ± 0.3. An in vivo study with 30 volunteers was undertaken to measure the UIC of 15 bathers immersed in the bath and 15 non-bathers sitting adjacent to the bath. Their UIC was analysed pre- and post-seaweed bath and corrected for creatinine concentration. The corrected UIC of the population shows an increase following the seaweed bath from a pre-treatment median of 76 µg L−1 to a post-treatment median of 95 µg L−1. The pre-treatment UIC for both groups did not indicate significant difference (p = 0.479); however, the post-treatment UIC for both did (p = 0.015) where the median bather test UIC was 86 µg L−1 and the non-bather UIC test was 105 µg L−1. Results indicate the bath has the potential to increase the UIC by a significant amount and that inhalation of volatile iodine is a more significant contributor to UIC than previously documented.

  • 2017 Outstanding Reviewers 2018-04-01