SEGH Articles

SEGH International Conference, Guangzhou, China 2017

24 May 2018
The 33rd International conference of the Society for Environmental Geochemistry and Health (SEGH 2017) was successfully held in Guangzhou, China

 

SEGH 2017 Closing Ceremony

Delegates attend the Closing Ceremony of SEGH 2017 in Guangzhou, China

The 33rd international conference of the Society for Environmental Geochemistry and Health (SEGH 2017) was successfully held in Guangzhou, China between June 30th – July 4th, 2017. This conference was hosted by the Guangdong University of Technology and the Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, CAS, China. Approximately 550 abstracts were submitted and grouped into 27 sessions. More than 500 delegates came from 27 countries and regions. Three academics and four distinguished scientists from Europe, USA and China delivered plenary lectures. Seventy seven keynote speakers as well as 90 invited speakers were in attendance. In addition, 66 volunteers from local universities provided great service for this conference. Based on this exciting conference, a virtual special issue, including 20 full-length submitted papers on Ecotoxicology and Environmental Safety, was organized. Ten Best Poster Prizes were awarded by the conference with the support of the American Geophysical Union (AGU) and Elsevier publishers. A selection of photographs from the converence are provided below.

Dr. Chaosheng Zhang, delivers a welcome remark

Dr Chaosheng Zhang gives a welcome address to delegates

Prof. Taicheng An introduces SEGH 2017

Prof Taicheng An, Chair of SEGH 2017, intorduces the event and welcomes delegates

The president of Guangdong University of Technology

Prof Xin Chen, President of Guangdong University of Technology, gives a welcoming address

Prof. Shu Tao, Academic from the Chinese Academy of Sciences

Prof Shu Tao from the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) delivers a plenary lecture

The plenary lecture of SEGH 2017

Delegates attend a plenary session

Delegates at SEGH 2017

Captivated delegates listening intently to a plenary lecture

Poster Prize Ceremony, SEGH 2017

Poster Prizes are presented. Many congratulations to: 

 
Yuling Wu, Xiamen University, China: Temporal Trends And Transport of Perfluorinated Compounds (PFCs) in A Subtropical Estuary: Jiulong River Estuary, China
 
Weijun Tian, Ocean University of China, China: Application of Cinder gel-beads/reeds Combination Strategy for Bioremediation of High Molecular Weight PAHs- Contaminated Estuarine Wetlands
 
Yuechang Wei, China University of Petroleum, Beijing, China: Novel Active Structure of Noble Metal-Oxides on 3DOM Oxides with Enhanced Catalytic Activity for Soot Oxidation
 
Honghong Wang, Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, CAS, China: Theoretical Investigation of Formaldehyde Adsorption on the Anatase TiO2 (101) Surface
 
Weigang Wang, Institute of Chemistry, CAS, China: Optical Properties of Secondary Organic Aerosols Derived From Long-Chain Alkanes under Various Nox and Seed Conditions
 
Yuanhong Zhong, Guangdong University of Technology, China: Facile Synthesis of Chromium Substituted Magnetite Nanorods with High Performance of Heterogeneous UVA-LED/Fenton Catalytic Activity
 
Wanbing Gong, Institute of Solid State Physics, CAS, China: H2-Hydrogenation/Transfer Hydrogenation of Bio-Derived Furfural using Sulfonate Group Modified (Cu, Ni) Catalysts
 
Haibo Yin, Division of Materials and Manufacturing Science Graduate School of Engineering, China: High-surface-area Plasmonic MoO3-x: Rational Synthesis and Enhanced Ammonia Borane Dehydrogenation Activity
 
Shang Chen, Central China Normal University, China: Promoted Surface Oxygen Vacancy Regeneration for Sustainable Molecular Oxygen Activation on BiOCl Facets via Phosphoric Acid Modification
 
Xiaoran Wei, Shandong University: The Effect of Silica Nanoparticles on Phospholipid Membrane Fluidity


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Latest on-line papers from the SEGH journal: Environmental Geochemistry and Health

  • Microplastics in the benthic invertebrates from the coastal waters of Kochi, Southeastern Arabian Sea 2018-08-01

    Abstract

    This study examined microplastic particles present in the benthic invertebrates Sternaspis scutata, Magelona cinta (deposit feeders) and Tellina sp. (suspension feeder) from the surface sediments of off-Kochi, southwest coast of India. The microplastic particles and thread-like fibres detected in these organisms were identified to be polystyrene by using DXR Raman microscope. Examination of the microplastic particle in Sternaspis scutata by epifluorescent microscopy showed fragmentation marks on the surface suggesting that the microplastic particle was degraded/weathered in nature. The study provides preliminary evidence of the presence of microplastics in benthic fauna from the coastal waters of India. However, further studies are required to understand the sources, distribution, fate and toxicity of the different types of microplastics in benthic invertebrates in order to identify any potential threats to higher trophic level organisms.

  • Mercury bioaccumulation in arthropods from typical community habitats in a zinc-smelting area 2018-08-01

    Abstract

    This study assessed the enrichment of mercury in the food web from the different community habitats in a zinc-smelting area of China. We used a nitrogen stable isotope technique to analyze trophic level relationships among arthropods and found that the first trophic level consisted of plants in the different community habitats, the second trophic level consisted of herbivores such as locusts and grasshoppers (primary consumers), and the third trophic level included spiders and mantes (secondary consumers). Mercury enrichment in the primary consumers was not evident, but enrichment in arthropods of the third trophic level was significant. The average of enrichment coefficients in spiders and mantes was greater than 1. The δ15N values indicated that mercury concentrations accumulated from primary producers to top carnivorous arthropods increased. In this zinc-smelting area, the biological amplification of mercury in the food web is significant. It is reasonable to assume that humans, located at the top of the food chain, are exposed to biomagnified levels of mercury.

  • Hydrogeochemical processes identification and groundwater pollution causes analysis in the northern Ordos Cretaceous Basin, China 2018-08-01

    Abstract

    It is necessary to identify the hydrogeochemical processes and analyze the causes of groundwater pollution due to the lack of knowledge about the groundwater chemical characteristics and the endemic diseases caused by groundwater pollution in the northern Ordos Cretaceous Basin. In this paper, groundwater chemical facies were obtained using the piper trilinear diagram based on the analysis of 190 samples. The hydrogeochemical processes were identified using ionic ratio coefficient, such as leaching, evaporation and condensation. The causes and sources of groundwater pollution were analyzed by correspondence analysis, and the spatial distribution and enrichment reasons of fluoride ion were analyzed considering the endemic fluorosis emphatically. The results show that leaching, evaporation and condensation, mixing, and anthropogenic activities all had significant impact on hydrogeochemical processes in the study area. However, cation exchange and adsorption effects were strong in the S2 and S3 groundwater flow systems, but weak in S1. Groundwater is mainly polluted by Mn and CODMn in the study area. The landfill leachate, domestic sewage, and other organic pollutants, excessive use of pesticides and fertilizers in agriculture, and pyrite oxidation from long-term and large-scale exploitation of coal are the sources of groundwater pollution. The S1 has the highest degree of groundwater pollution, followed by S2 and S3. High concentration of fluoride ion is mainly distributed in the north and west of study area. Evaporation and condensation and groundwater chemistry component are the most important causes of fluoride ion enrichment. The results obtained in this study will be useful for understanding the groundwater quality for effective management and utilization of groundwater resources and assurance of drinking water safety.