SEGH Articles

SEGH International Conference, Guangzhou, China 2017

24 May 2018
The 33rd International conference of the Society for Environmental Geochemistry and Health (SEGH 2017) was successfully held in Guangzhou, China

 

SEGH 2017 Closing Ceremony

Delegates attend the Closing Ceremony of SEGH 2017 in Guangzhou, China

The 33rd international conference of the Society for Environmental Geochemistry and Health (SEGH 2017) was successfully held in Guangzhou, China between June 30th – July 4th, 2017. This conference was hosted by the Guangdong University of Technology and the Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, CAS, China. Approximately 550 abstracts were submitted and grouped into 27 sessions. More than 500 delegates came from 27 countries and regions. Three academics and four distinguished scientists from Europe, USA and China delivered plenary lectures. Seventy seven keynote speakers as well as 90 invited speakers were in attendance. In addition, 66 volunteers from local universities provided great service for this conference. Based on this exciting conference, a virtual special issue, including 20 full-length submitted papers on Ecotoxicology and Environmental Safety, was organized. Ten Best Poster Prizes were awarded by the conference with the support of the American Geophysical Union (AGU) and Elsevier publishers. A selection of photographs from the converence are provided below.

Dr. Chaosheng Zhang, delivers a welcome remark

Dr Chaosheng Zhang gives a welcome address to delegates

Prof. Taicheng An introduces SEGH 2017

Prof Taicheng An, Chair of SEGH 2017, intorduces the event and welcomes delegates

The president of Guangdong University of Technology

Prof Xin Chen, President of Guangdong University of Technology, gives a welcoming address

Prof. Shu Tao, Academic from the Chinese Academy of Sciences

Prof Shu Tao from the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) delivers a plenary lecture

The plenary lecture of SEGH 2017

Delegates attend a plenary session

Delegates at SEGH 2017

Captivated delegates listening intently to a plenary lecture

Poster Prize Ceremony, SEGH 2017

Poster Prizes are presented. Many congratulations to: 

 
Yuling Wu, Xiamen University, China: Temporal Trends And Transport of Perfluorinated Compounds (PFCs) in A Subtropical Estuary: Jiulong River Estuary, China
 
Weijun Tian, Ocean University of China, China: Application of Cinder gel-beads/reeds Combination Strategy for Bioremediation of High Molecular Weight PAHs- Contaminated Estuarine Wetlands
 
Yuechang Wei, China University of Petroleum, Beijing, China: Novel Active Structure of Noble Metal-Oxides on 3DOM Oxides with Enhanced Catalytic Activity for Soot Oxidation
 
Honghong Wang, Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, CAS, China: Theoretical Investigation of Formaldehyde Adsorption on the Anatase TiO2 (101) Surface
 
Weigang Wang, Institute of Chemistry, CAS, China: Optical Properties of Secondary Organic Aerosols Derived From Long-Chain Alkanes under Various Nox and Seed Conditions
 
Yuanhong Zhong, Guangdong University of Technology, China: Facile Synthesis of Chromium Substituted Magnetite Nanorods with High Performance of Heterogeneous UVA-LED/Fenton Catalytic Activity
 
Wanbing Gong, Institute of Solid State Physics, CAS, China: H2-Hydrogenation/Transfer Hydrogenation of Bio-Derived Furfural using Sulfonate Group Modified (Cu, Ni) Catalysts
 
Haibo Yin, Division of Materials and Manufacturing Science Graduate School of Engineering, China: High-surface-area Plasmonic MoO3-x: Rational Synthesis and Enhanced Ammonia Borane Dehydrogenation Activity
 
Shang Chen, Central China Normal University, China: Promoted Surface Oxygen Vacancy Regeneration for Sustainable Molecular Oxygen Activation on BiOCl Facets via Phosphoric Acid Modification
 
Xiaoran Wei, Shandong University: The Effect of Silica Nanoparticles on Phospholipid Membrane Fluidity


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Science in the News

Latest on-line papers from the SEGH journal: Environmental Geochemistry and Health

  • Temperature inversion and air pollution relationship, and its effects on human health in Hanoi City, Vietnam 2018-09-18

    Abstract

    This study aimed to investigate the effects of temperature inversions on the concentration of some pollutants in the atmosphere in Hanoi City, Vietnam, during the period from 2011 to 2015. This work also aimed to evaluate relationships between the thermal inversion and health effects that are associated with air pollution. During this period, the temperature inversions were most frequently presenting from November to March in Hanoi City. Air quality data was gathered from air quality monitoring stations located in the study area. The data showed that levels of NO2, SO2, PM10 and PM2.5 increased when the inversions strengthened. Cases of two types of diseases (acute respiratory diseases and cardiovascular diseases), which are linked to atmospheric air pollution, were considered on number of patients under 15 and above 60 years old at National Geriatric Hospital and National Otorhinolaryngology Hospital. There was significant increase in the daily average number of hospital visits with increasing surface-based inversions. The statistical analysis showed that the temperature inversions correlated with concentration of air pollutants and the number of patients in 5 years.

  • Evaluation of the diagnostic ratios of adamantanes for identifying seriously weathered spilled oils from simulated experiment and actual oil spills 2018-09-17

    Abstract

    The composition and physical properties of spilled oil have great changes during the seriously weathering process. It brings great difficulties to the source identification of oil spill. So the stable and trustworthy diagnostic ratios (DRs) for accurate identification of severely weathered spilled oils are very important. The explosion of Sinopec pipeline happened on November 22, 2013 at Qingdao, China. Local beaches at Jiaozhou Bay were polluted by spilled oils. We have collected original spilled oil samples from an area free from human interference near the oil leakage point after the accident. Synchronized with actual beach weathering, laboratory experiments were conducted to simulate oil weathering for 360 days by using the collected original spilled oil samples. Based on t test and the repeatability limit method, 50 diagnostic ratios (DRs) of adamantanes were screened. Four DRs, namely 1,3-dimethyladamantane/total dimethyladamantane, 1-methyladamantane/(1-methyladamantane + 1,3-dimethyladamantane), dialkyl diamantane/total diamantane, and diamantane/(diamantane + dialkyl diamantane), have maintained remarkable stability during the simulated weathering experiments and field weathering process. These stable ratios can retain the characteristics of oil source during weathering. They are very beneficial to improve the accuracy of identifying the source of severely weathered oil and can be used as an effective supplement to existing index system for source identification.

  • Environmental impact assessment of uranium exploration and development on indigenous land in Labrador (Canada): a community-driven initiative 2018-09-17

    Abstract

    There is hardly any study on environmental impacts of uranium exploration and mining development prior to actual mining activities. Rather, the majority of the literature addresses the environmental impacts of either ongoing or decommissioned mines. The objective of the study was to measure the possible radioactive contamination (total uranium and lead) in the local ecosystem surrounding an abandoned uranium development site on indigenous land in Labrador (Canada). Water (brook and ponds), soil/sediments (brook and ponds), plants (growing along the brook and pond shores), and local fish (trout) and clams from bays were collected from mine development site, downstream, and control sites. Uranium and lead mobilization in the local environment appears to be slightly enhanced near the proposed mining site, but rapidly drops downstream. Developing a low-cost, community-based environmental health monitoring tool is an ideal strategy for generating baseline information and further follow-up.