SEGH Articles

DustSafe Citizen Science Study: Harmful contaminants in house dust

07 June 2019
Khadija Jabeen and Jane Entwistle Faculty of Engineering & Environment, Northumbria University, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK tell us about DustSafe, a global citizen-science project.

Household air pollution results in an estimated 4.25 million premature deaths globally each year (WHO, 2014), representing a significant, and growing contemporary public health challenge. The majority of these deaths are associated with fine particulate matter (PM), or ‘dust’, with PM declared a carcinogen by IARC in 2003. Exposure to PM can initiate or enhance disease in humans, yet the nature of the hazard that house dust presents remains poorly characterized from a toxicological and a source perspective (Moschet et al., 2018). As over 80% of the average day is spent in homes, workplaces and/or travel, indoor exposure to dust and its intrinsic physical, chemical and biological entities represents one of modern society’s greatest potential exposures to harmful substances (EPA,2015). Dust can penetrate deep into the lung and contain harmful agents, including metal(oids), microbes and other allergens. With reports of poor air quality regularly making headline news, the study of our indoor home biome (Fig. 1), has never been more timely or of mass popular interest and relevance.

Fig. 1 Components of the indoor biome

Fig. 1 Components of the indoor biome

House dust is an important environmental matrix due to its function as a repository of pollutants produced from various anthropogenic and biogenic processes. Such indoor dusts are a reservoir for toxic metal(oids), such as lead, cadmium and arsenic, many of which have been detected at environmentally relevant concentrations (Reis et al., 2018; Rasmussen et al., 2013), and recent studies highlight links between environmental pollutants in our house dusts and the health of children living in those homes (Kollitz et al. 2018).

Fig. 2 DustSafe citizen science promotional flyer


DustSafe is a global citizen-science project (Fig. 2) and a collaboration between a number of universities, including Northumbria University (UK), Macquarie University (Australia) and Indiana-Purdue University (USA). The aim is to provide a detailed understanding of the intrinsic characteristics and global variability of our indoor home dust biome, focusing on selected chemical, physical and biological characteristics and attendant hazards.

DustSafe needs YOU (well, actually it needs your dust)please register at the website (www.360dustanalysis.com) and send us your vacuum cleaner dust, or bring a sample along to the Society for Environmental Geochemistry’s (SEGH) 35th International Conference in Manchester this year.

Sample your vacuum cleaner today and join DustSafe (Further details of what/how to sample available on the website). Look out for us at SEGH’s 35th International Conference in July this year where will be presenting initial UK results from this exciting citizen-led initiative. Contact Khadija Jabeen for more details (Khadija.jabeen@northumbria.ac.uk).



                   Fig. 2 DustSafe citizen science promotional flyer


References

EPA 2015 https://cfpub.epa.gov/roe/chapter/air/indoorair.cfm

Kollitz et al. 2018 ES&T 52:11857-64

Moschet et al. 2018 ES&T 52:2878–87

Rasmussen et al. 2013 Sci Total Environ 443:520–529

Reis et al. 2018 Environ Sci Process Impacts 20:1210–24

WHO 2014 Burden of disease from household air pollution

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