Diverse scientific fields and multidisciplinary expertise brought together within an international community

About SEGH


SEGH was established in 1971 to provide a forum for scientists from various disciplines to work together in understanding the interaction between the geochemical environment and the health of plants, animals, and humans.

SEGH recognizes the importance of interdisciplinary research, representing expertise in a diverse range of scientific fields, such as biology, engineering, geology, hydrology, epidemiology, chemistry, medicine, nutrition, and toxicology.

SEGH members come from a variety of backgrounds within the academic, regulatory, and industrial communities, thus providing a representative perspective on current issues and concerns.

SEGH membership is international and there are regional sections to coordinate activities in Europe, Americas and Asia/ Pacific.




Organisational Profile

President: Dr Michael Watts, British Geological Survey. mwatts@bgs.ac.uk

Regional chairs:

African Chair European Chair Americas Chair Asia/Pacific Chair
Dr Godfrey Sakala TBC Dr. Kieth Torrance Prof. Taicheng An








Organisational roles

Membership Secretary / Treasurer Secretary Webmaster
Mrs Anthea Brown Dr Gillian Gibson Dr Daniel Middleton
Rt. British Geological Survey GBGibson Consulting

International Agency for Research on Cancer


seghmembership@gmail.com segh.secretary@gmail.com seghwebmaster@gmail.com


SEGH is a member of the Geological Society of America's Associated Society Partnerships.  For more information on educational programmes, collaborations and communications link to www.geosociety.org.

China-Ireland Consortium: Taicheng An (China), Yongguan Zhu (China) , Chaosheng Zhang (NUI Galway, Ireland)”

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Members can keep in touch with their colleagues through short news and events articles of interest to the SEGH community.

Science in the News

Latest on-line papers from the SEGH journal: Environmental Geochemistry and Health

  • Erratum to: Preliminary assessment of surface soil lead concentrations in Melbourne, Australia 2018-04-01
  • In vivo uptake of iodine from a Fucus serratus Linnaeus seaweed bath: does volatile iodine contribute? 2018-04-01


    Seaweed baths containing Fucus serratus Linnaeus are a rich source of iodine which has the potential to increase the urinary iodide concentration (UIC) of the bather. In this study, the range of total iodine concentration in seawater (22–105 µg L−1) and seaweed baths (808–13,734 µg L−1) was measured over 1 year. The seasonal trend shows minimum levels in summer (May–July) and maximum in winter (November–January). The bathwater pH was found to be acidic, average pH 5.9 ± 0.3. An in vivo study with 30 volunteers was undertaken to measure the UIC of 15 bathers immersed in the bath and 15 non-bathers sitting adjacent to the bath. Their UIC was analysed pre- and post-seaweed bath and corrected for creatinine concentration. The corrected UIC of the population shows an increase following the seaweed bath from a pre-treatment median of 76 µg L−1 to a post-treatment median of 95 µg L−1. The pre-treatment UIC for both groups did not indicate significant difference (p = 0.479); however, the post-treatment UIC for both did (p = 0.015) where the median bather test UIC was 86 µg L−1 and the non-bather UIC test was 105 µg L−1. Results indicate the bath has the potential to increase the UIC by a significant amount and that inhalation of volatile iodine is a more significant contributor to UIC than previously documented.

  • 2017 Outstanding Reviewers 2018-04-01