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Journal of Environmental Geochemistry and Health

 

Environmental Geochemistry and Health is the Official Journal of the Society for Environmental Geochemistry and Health.  The journal publishes original research papers, research notes and reviews across the broad field of environmental geochemistry.

  • Environmental geochemistry establishes and explains links between the chemical composition of rocks and minerals and the health of plants, animals and people.
  • Beneficial elements regulate or promote enzymatic and hormonal activity, whereas other elements may be toxic.
  • Bedrock geochemistry controls the composition of soil and hence that of water and vegetation.
  • Pollution arising from the extraction and use of mineral resources distorts natural geochemical systems.
  • Geochemical surveys of soil, water and plants show how major and trace elements are distributed geographically.
  • Associated epidemiological studies reveal the possibility of links between the geochemical environment and disease.
  • Experimental research illuminates the nature or consequences of natural geochemical processes.

High quality research papers or reviews dealing with any aspect of environmental geochemistry are welcomed.  Submission of papers which directly link health and the environment are particularly encouraged.  Papers may be theoretical, interpretative or experimental.  Authors shoud refer to  www.springer.com/10653 for more information and authors' instructions.

 

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Latest on-line papers from the SEGH journal: Environmental Geochemistry and Health

  • Release of mobile forms of hazardous elements from glassworks fly ash into soils 2014-04-17

    Abstract

    The release of hazardous elements from the wastes of high-temperature processes represents a risk to the environment. We focused on the alteration of fly ash (FA) from glassworks collected from an electrostatic filter. FA contains elevated concentrations of Zn and Ba, among other elements. Overtime, small amounts of FA have been emitted from the factory and settled into the surrounding environment (soil). In order to assess the possible risks to the environment, samples of FA were placed in small nylon bags and deposited in 11 different soil horizons (containing diverse vegetation cover such as spruce and beech and also unforested areas). Samples of the FA in bags were exposed in the soils for 1 year. Then, the bags were collected, and the exposed soils in the direct vicinity of the FA bags were sampled. The total concentrations of Zn and Ba in the FA, as well as in the soil samples (original and exposed), were determined by ICP MS. The “mobile fraction” was determined as the exchangeable (acid extractable) fraction of the modified BCR sequential extraction procedure (SEP). The SEP results indicate that Zn and Ba may pose a potential environmental risk. Their concentrations in the first, most mobile, and bioavailable fraction increased in all the exposed soils. The most significant increases were observed in the upper soil horizons (litter and A horizon). The risk to the environment was evaluated on the basis of the Risk Assessment Code.

  • Selected papers from the 29th SEGH Conference on Environmental Geochemistry and Health 2014-04-16
  • Urinary arsenic levels influenced by abandoned mine tailings in the Southernmost Baja California Peninsula, Mexico 2014-04-16

    Abstract

    Gold has been mined at San Antonio-El Triunfo, (Baja California Sur, Mexico) since the 18th century. This area has approximately 5,700 inhabitants living in the San Juan de Los Planes and El Carrizal hydrographic basins, close to more than 100 abandoned mining sites containing tailings contaminated with potentially toxic elements such as arsenic. To evaluate the arsenic exposure of humans living in the surrounding areas, urinary arsenic species, such as inorganic arsenic (iAs) and the metabolites mono-methylated (MMA) and di-methylated arsenic acids (DMA), were evaluated in 275 residents (18–84 years of age). Arsenic species in urine were analyzed by hydride generation-cryotrapping-atomic absorption spectrometry, which excludes the non-toxic forms of arsenic such as those found in seafood. Urinary samples contained a total arsenic concentration (sum of arsenical species) which ranged from 1.3 to 398.7 ng mL−1, indicating 33 % of the inhabitants exceeded the biological exposition index (BEI = 35 ng mL−1), the permissible limit for occupational exposure. The mean relative urinary arsenic species were 9, 11 and 80 % for iAs, MMA and DMA, respectively, in the Los Planes basin, and 17, 10 and 73 %, respectively, in the El Carrizal basin. These data indicated that environmental intervention is required to address potential health issues in this area.