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Journal of Environmental Geochemistry and Health

 

Environmental Geochemistry and Health is the Official Journal of the Society for Environmental Geochemistry and Health.  The journal publishes original research papers, research notes and reviews across the broad field of environmental geochemistry.

  • Environmental geochemistry establishes and explains links between the chemical composition of rocks and minerals and the health of plants, animals and people.
  • Beneficial elements regulate or promote enzymatic and hormonal activity, whereas other elements may be toxic.
  • Bedrock geochemistry controls the composition of soil and hence that of water and vegetation.
  • Pollution arising from the extraction and use of mineral resources distorts natural geochemical systems.
  • Geochemical surveys of soil, water and plants show how major and trace elements are distributed geographically.
  • Associated epidemiological studies reveal the possibility of links between the geochemical environment and disease.
  • Experimental research illuminates the nature or consequences of natural geochemical processes.

High quality research papers or reviews dealing with any aspect of environmental geochemistry are welcomed.  Submission of papers which directly link health and the environment are particularly encouraged.  Papers may be theoretical, interpretative or experimental.  Authors shoud refer to  www.springer.com/10653 for more information and authors' instructions.

 

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Science in the News

Latest on-line papers from the SEGH journal: Environmental Geochemistry and Health

  • Preface: Selected papers from the 30th SEGH Conference on Environmental Geochemistry and Health 2015-08-01
  • Measuring the solid-phase fractionation of lead in urban and rural soils using a combination of geochemical survey data and chemical extractions 2015-08-01

    Abstract

    The study used 276 urban soils and 447 rural soils collected from in and around the UK town of Northampton and focussed on the fractionation of Pb. The Pb fractionation obtained from total element data was compared to the fractionation of Pb in a subset of 10 urban soils obtained using a sequential extraction method. The fractionation of the Pb from the total element data and from the sequential extractions was estimated using a self-modelling mixture resolution statistical model. The bioaccessibility of Pb in a subset of 50 of the urban soils, as measured using the unified BARGE method, was shown to be quantitatively linked with Pb fractionation from both the total element and the sequential extraction data. Three intrinsic soil components from the regional total element data model and one physico-chemical component from the sequential extraction data model were identified as the sources of bioaccessible Pb. The source of bioaccessible Pb in both rural and urban soils was tentatively identified as a fine-grained pyromorphite mineral.

  • Arsenic hazard in Cambodian rice from a market-based survey with a case study of Preak Russey village, Kandal Province 2015-08-01

    Abstract

    This study comprises a market-based survey to assess the arsenic (As) hazard of Cambodian rice, encompassing rice from seven Cambodian provinces, comparisons with rice imported from China, Vietnam and Thailand, and assessments of 15 rice varieties. Rice samples (n = 157) were collected from four large markets in Kandal Province and analysed for As using inductively coupled mass spectrometry. The mean As concentration for Cambodian rice (0.185 µg g−1, range 0.047–0.771 µg g−1) was higher than that for imported rice from Vietnam and Thailand (0.162 and 0.157 µg g−1, respectively) with mean As concentrations highest in rice from Prey Veng Province resulting in a daily dose of 1.77 µg kg−1 b.w. (body weight) d−1. Between unmilled rice varieties, Cambodian-grown White Sticky Rice had the highest mean As concentration (0.234 µg g−1), whilst White Sticky Rice produced in Thailand had the lowest (0.125 µg g−1), suggesting that localised conditions have greater bearing over rice As concentrations than differences in As uptake between individual varieties themselves. A rice and water consumption survey for 15 respondents in the village of Preak Russey revealed mean consumption rates of 522 g d−1 of rice and 1.9 L d−1 of water. At water As concentrations >1000 µg L−1, the relative contribution to the daily dose from rice is low. When water As concentrations are lowered to 50 µg L−1, daily doses from rice and water are both generally below the 3.0 µg kg−1 b.w. d−1 benchmark daily limit for a 0.5 % increase in lung cancer, yet when combined they exceeded this value in all but three respondents.