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Journal of Environmental Geochemistry and Health


Environmental Geochemistry and Health is the Official Journal of the Society for Environmental Geochemistry and Health.  The journal publishes original research papers, research notes and reviews across the broad field of environmental geochemistry.

  • Environmental geochemistry establishes and explains links between the chemical composition of rocks and minerals and the health of plants, animals and people.
  • Beneficial elements regulate or promote enzymatic and hormonal activity, whereas other elements may be toxic.
  • Bedrock geochemistry controls the composition of soil and hence that of water and vegetation.
  • Pollution arising from the extraction and use of mineral resources distorts natural geochemical systems.
  • Geochemical surveys of soil, water and plants show how major and trace elements are distributed geographically.
  • Associated epidemiological studies reveal the possibility of links between the geochemical environment and disease.
  • Experimental research illuminates the nature or consequences of natural geochemical processes.

High quality research papers or reviews dealing with any aspect of environmental geochemistry are welcomed.  Submission of papers which directly link health and the environment are particularly encouraged.  Papers may be theoretical, interpretative or experimental.  Authors shoud refer to for more information and authors' instructions.


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Latest on-line papers from the SEGH journal: Environmental Geochemistry and Health

  • Correlation of lithium levels between drinking water obtained from different sources and scalp hair samples of adult male subjects 2016-10-18


    There is some evidence that natural levels of lithium (Li) in drinking water may have a protective effect on neurological health. In present study, we evaluate the Li levels in drinking water of different origin and bottled mineral water. To evaluate the association between lithium levels in drinking water with human health, the scalp hair samples of male subjects (25–45 years) consumed drinking water obtained from ground water (GW), municipal treated water (MTW) and bottled mineral water (BMW) from rural and urban areas of Sindh, Pakistan were selected. The water samples were pre-concentrated five to tenfold at 60 °C using temperature-controlled electric hot plate. While scalp hair samples were oxidized by acid in a microwave oven, prior to determined by flame atomic absorption spectrometry. The Li content in different types of drinking water, GW, MTW and BMW was found in the range of 5.12–22.6, 4.2–16.7 and 0.0–16.3 µg/L, respectively. It was observed that Li concentration in the scalp hair samples of adult males consuming ground water was found to be higher, ranged as 292–393 μg/kg, than those who are drinking municipal treated and bottle mineral water (212–268 and 145–208 μg/kg), respectively.

  • On-road measurements of pollutant concentration profiles inside Yangkou tunnel, Qingdao, China 2016-10-18


    To obtain physical properties of pollutant concentrations encountered by vehicle commuters during travelling Yangkou tunnel (7.76 km) of Qingdao City, particle concentration measurements are accompanied by the measurements of gaseous species (CO and CO2). The field campaigns are on-road conducted from April 26 to September 23, 2014. Results demonstrate that the mean particle number concentrations observed within the tunnel at the normal traffic volume are 1.15 × 105 and 1.24 × 105 particles cm−3 for the southbound and northbound trip, respectively. Furthermore, the significance level of traffic volume to particle number concentration is analyzed by multivariate regression model. And a high correlation between pollutant concentrations and traffic intensity has been demonstrated. Consequently, the fuel-based emission factors of pollutants inside the tunnel are calculated and the personal exposures are derived. In addition, the profile of particle number concentration exhibits distinct dilution features between the exit of northbound bore and the exit of southbound bore. The explanation is attributed to the different long uphill trip within the tunnel. Results in this study offer meaningful understanding to explore the nature of pollutants within long tunnels.

  • Assessment of some potential harmful trace elements (PHTEs) in the borehole water of Greater Giyani, Limpopo Province, South Africa: possible implications for human health 2016-10-15


    The present investigation was conducted in order to evaluate the occurrence and distribution patterns of some potentially harmful trace elements in the borehole water of the Greater Giyani area, Limpopo, South Africa, and their possible implications on human health. Twenty-nine borehole water samples were collected in the dry season (July/August 2012) and another 27 samples from the same localities in the wet season (March 2013) from the study area. The samples were analysed for trace elements arsenic (As), cadmium (Cd), chromium (Cr), selenium (Se), and lead (Pb) using the inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry technique. The average concentrations of As, Cd, Cr, Se, and Pb were 11.3, 0.3, 33.1, 7.1, and 6.0 µg/L in the dry season and 11.0, 0.3, 28.3, 4.2, and 6.6 µg/L in the wet season, respectively. There was evidence of seasonal fluctuations in concentrations of all analysed elements except for As, though Cd and Pb displayed low concentrations (<0.2 and <6.0 µg/L, respectively) in almost all sampled boreholes. Se and Cr concentrations slightly exceed the South African National Standard permissible limits for safe drinking water in few boreholes. A total of four boreholes exceeded the water quality guideline for As with two of these boreholes containing five times more As than the prescribed limit. The spatial distribution patterns of elevated As closely correlate with the underlying geology. The findings of this investigation have important implications for human health of the communities drinking from the affected boreholes.