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Journal of Environmental Geochemistry and Health

 

Environmental Geochemistry and Health is the Official Journal of the Society for Environmental Geochemistry and Health.  The journal publishes original research papers, research notes and reviews across the broad field of environmental geochemistry.

  • Environmental geochemistry establishes and explains links between the chemical composition of rocks and minerals and the health of plants, animals and people.
  • Beneficial elements regulate or promote enzymatic and hormonal activity, whereas other elements may be toxic.
  • Bedrock geochemistry controls the composition of soil and hence that of water and vegetation.
  • Pollution arising from the extraction and use of mineral resources distorts natural geochemical systems.
  • Geochemical surveys of soil, water and plants show how major and trace elements are distributed geographically.
  • Associated epidemiological studies reveal the possibility of links between the geochemical environment and disease.
  • Experimental research illuminates the nature or consequences of natural geochemical processes.

High quality research papers or reviews dealing with any aspect of environmental geochemistry are welcomed.  Submission of papers which directly link health and the environment are particularly encouraged.  Papers may be theoretical, interpretative or experimental.  Authors shoud refer to  www.springer.com/10653 for more information and authors' instructions.

 

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Science in the News

Latest on-line papers from the SEGH journal: Environmental Geochemistry and Health

  • Preface 2016-08-01
  • Positive anomalous concentrations of Pb in some gabbroic rocks of Afikpo basin southeastern Nigeria 2016-08-01

    Abstract

    Gabbroic rocks have intruded the sedimentary sequence at Ameta in Afikpo basin southeastern Nigeria. Petrographic and geochemical features of the rocks were studied in order to evaluate their genetic and geotectonic history. The petrographic results show that the rocks contain plagioclase, olivine, pyroxene, biotite, iron oxide, and traces of quartz in three samples. Major element characteristics show that the rocks are subalkaline. In addition, the rocks have geochemical characteristics similar to basaltic andesites. The trace elements results show inconsistent concentrations of high field strength elements (Zr, Nb, Th, Ta), moderate enrichment of large-ion lithophile elements (Rb, Sr, Ba) and low concentrations of Ni and Cr. Rare earth element results show that the rocks are characterized by enrichment of light rare earth elements, middle rare earth elements enrichment, and depletion of heavy rare earth elements with slight positive europium anomalies. Zinc concentrations are within the normal range in basaltic rocks. There are extremely high concentrations of Pb in three of the rock samples. The high Pb concentrations in some of these rocks could be as a result of last episodes of magmatic crystallization. The rocks intruded the Asu River Group; organic components in the sedimentary sequence probably contain Pb which has been assimilated into the magma at the evolutionary stage of the magma. Weathering of some rocks that contain galena could lead to an increase in the concentration of lead in the gabbroic rocks, especially when the migration and crystallization of magma take place in an aqueous environment. Nevertheless, high concentration of lead is hazardous to health and environment.

  • Estimated lead (Pb) exposures for a population of urban community gardeners 2016-08-01

    Abstract

    Urban community gardens provide affordable, locally grown, healthy foods and many other benefits. However, urban garden soils can contain lead (Pb) that may pose risks to human health. To help evaluate these risks, we measured Pb concentrations in soil, vegetables, and chicken eggs from New York City community gardens, and we asked gardeners about vegetable consumption and time spent in the garden. We then estimated Pb intakes deterministically and probabilistically for adult gardeners, children who spend time in the garden, and adult (non-gardener) household members. Most central tendency Pb intakes were below provisional total tolerable intake (PTTI) levels. High contact intakes generally exceeded PTTIs. Probabilistic estimates showed approximately 40 % of children and 10 % of gardeners exceeding PTTIs. Children’s exposure came primarily from dust ingestion and exposure to higher Pb soil between beds. Gardeners’ Pb intakes were comparable to children’s (in µg/day) but were dominated by vegetable consumption. Adult household members ate less garden-grown produce than gardeners and had the lowest Pb intakes. Our results suggest that healthy gardening practices to reduce Pb exposure in urban community gardens should focus on encouraging cultivation of lower Pb vegetables (i.e., fruits) for adult gardeners and on covering higher Pb non-bed soils accessible to young children. However, the common practice of replacement of root-zone bed soil with clean soil (e.g., in raised beds) has many benefits and should also continue to be encouraged.